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business with the united states that is making a very big profit. china is going to make $300 billion on us at least this year. and they just revised that recently, i don't know if you saw. they said those numbers are going to be low. so we have to take our country back. >> what do you think of this gang of six plan? do you think it's workable from what you've seen? >> from what i've seen, nobody really knows exactly what it represents and what it is yet. but at least they're in there pitches and trying to make the big deal. the big deal is really the deal they should make. i don't like the punt. i don't like the deal where we kick it down the road for six months. this is the time to make the deal. and i have to tell you, the republicans have the cards. people might not think that, but the republicans have all of the cards. and this is the time to get rid of obama care. this is the time to make the great deal. >> i've been following you on twitter and you've been aggressive about obama on the economy. you believe he can't stop spending and that america has to stop spending. one of his belie
been a big hit in london "evita" here had bad reviews. the mood changed. funny enough, i think that's an intriguing one because in the late '70s america was a little bit in denial about talking about anything political. i mean, you remember the time, after vietnam, and i remember writing the early days of the "evita" run we hit the -- at the same time of the russian invasion of afghanistan, which i don't think anybody really completely understood what was going on. for give me for talking about afghanistan. i've gone off on a tangent. >> another time. >> suddenly people started talking about politics again. they said, maybe paralleled with what we were trying to say there was an interesting subject. >> how much have the critics gotten to you over the years? >> i don't really care very much if i don't think the critics really understand music. >> somebody that you respect, what is the most hurtful kind of thing they could say that would really get to you? >> i guess somebody who i did respect as a musician said that the score was humdrum or something, then i would be sad if i believe
have a big stake in is apple, of course. steve jobs has done an extraordinary job there. their recent profits were just astronomical again. obviously, they're a big global company, and they've aggressively marketed in countries all over the world. do you think america's doing enough of that? do you think it's time they went back to designing, creating, and building things they can sell to the world exactly as apple is doing so successfully? >> well, clearly, apple is a role model of the american innovation whereby it produced all these products -- ipod, iphone, ipad -- that is really now dominating all the technology arena in the world. clearly, apple is a role model, and i believe the united states, with all its problems, is down but for sure is not out. i hope that an awakening happens in the united states whereby to go back to the roots of the main success of america, which is innovation and encouraging more ideas and more thoughts to be integrated in the u.s. system. >> are you concerned at all about the succession plans at apple given the ongoing situation involving steve jobs' h
. >> yes. i think, although "evita" was a big hit in london. "evita" when it opened here had pretty bad reviews. then the mood sort of changed. i think that's an intriguing one because in the kind of late '70s america was a little bit in denial about talking about anything political. you remember the time. after vietnam, after everything and i remember writing in the early days of the "evita" run we hit the -- same time of the russian invasion of afghanistan which nobody understood what was going on. i'm going off on a tangent. it changed -- suddenly people started to talk about politics again and said well maybe eva peron and what we were trying to say there was an interesting subject. >> how much did the critics get to you over the years? >> i didn't care very much if i don't think that the critics understand music. >> but somebody you respect, what's the most hurtful kind of thing that they would say that would get to you. >> somebody who i did respect as a musician said that the score was humdrum or something then i would be sad if i believed in the score. there are always going to
a big difference in your community or another community >>> tonight, washington in turmoil. >> we cannot borrow more money. we have to balance our budget. >> we're running out of time. it's time we get serious about finding a compromise. >> americans outraged. >> they can't seem to get it together and compromise. >> we have adults who have been elected to office, and yet they play worse than 3-year-olds. >> i'd fire them all. >> what would it take to get a deal done? i'll ask the white house and the republicans. plus, what this crisis is already costing you. and adam levine, rock star, maroon 5 front man. he's sold more than 15 million albums. he's conquered tv on his first season of "the voice." >> christina takes things to a whole new level, right? you can level with me. >> i can't on national television. >> but tonight his biggest challenge yet. i'm getting him to do something you've never, i mean never seen him do before. >> this is so dumb. i don't know why i can do it. >> that is incredible. >> the amazingly multitalented adam levine. this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evenin
cloud over this economy at this vital time. >> how big a problem is the split in the republican party? and the reason i ask you that is that senator mccain has come out very strongly and angrily today lambasting those on the tea party side of the gop saying that their demands of balancing the budget and so on are completely fanciful. he calls them hobbits. clearly there's a split there amongst some republicans, but is that helpful or a hindrance to trying to get a deal here? >> look, i think the leaders have set terms that i think allow for a type of compromise. the thing the president's been talking most about, which is the importance of making sure that we do not keep the specter of default hanging over our economy narks tha we have a debt limit that's extended into 2013 so we provide some stoernt investors and job creators in our economy, that's something that virtually all of the democratic and republican leadership has called for during most of these negotiations. almost everybody wants some form of a down payment on deficit reduction. almost everybody believes we need to come ba
know. >> what's the key to getting back on your feet when you've had a big blow? >> dust yourself off. it's just like baseball. i compare life to a baseball game a lot of times. other times you know you dive in. you might get called out. you might get safe, whatever. you get that dirt on you. the first thing you want to do is collect yourself and dust yourself off. and life is a game of making adjustments, you know. and it's a journey. and i think that for all of us, including myself, i think it's a matter of going through this journey of life and sometimes you make good calls, sometimes you make bad calls. but the main thing is knowing the difference and making adjustments. >> what would you say has been the best and worst moments of your life? >> mm. well, the best. the best being here with you. >> of course. from the obvious. apart from that. >> apart from that, the best would be sitting on top of the hill with my kids. dad. sitting around a fire. roasting marshmallows. laughing, talking about life. just living and being happy. >> existing in a blissful scenario. >> i think -- agai
. and i guess, obviously, because it's a country of immigrants, it becomes this big thing. but from your perspective, what would you do? how would you fix things? >> that's a loaded question. it's a big question too. and i think there's so much misinformation out there, and i will immediately disclaim that i am not the expert in this field. although i am pretty literate. i'm pretty literate in this particular issue, because of people that are in my life and my mentors and people that i surround myself, because i really want to understand what the problem is. latinos in america are american and i think we forget that we're trying to categorize every mexican or every mexican american as illegal or undocumented and that's just not true. nobody wants illegal immigration. you know, what happened in arizona, i think, created a dialogue that we needed to have. and for immigration, it's been on the administration -- on the agenda for the past three administrations. so people like to blame obama and they're going to blame a lot of people for it -- >> well, there's this huge expectation with obama
't like guinness? >> no, i'm not a big fan. not a big fan. >> sacrilege. >> i know! i know. but if i was going to drink any beer, it would usually be heineken or corona. usually heineken. >> you're from the north of ireland. describe your upbringing. to many americans in particular, they know there's been a lot of trouble in northern island for many years. for a young man growing up in ireland, what was it like for you there? >> personally i never seen the violence. i grew up in a very tiny town just outside of belfast. in terms of trouble, it was only on the tv, on the news. i never experienced it firsthand. if anyone ever asked me about northern ireland and the troubles, i can't really say to them what it's like because i've never actually seen it. it is a pity that these things are put on the news and i'd rather see northern ireland portrayed in a more positive light. >> it's a lot more peaceful there now. there are still incidents occasionally but certainly when i grew up there it was a lot more violent. seems like northern ireland's come through that dark period. one the reasons
of the house. obviously, they don't agree on a number of issue. their big differences and principle differences. each gentleman was convinced there was a way to reach compromise. we came very close. that involved tough political decisions. it included a willingness to cut deeply in our discretionary spending. a willingness to reinform our entitlement programs and a willingness by republicans to find savings in our pentagon budget and saving tlus tax code to raise revv neufville that is what was on the table. we came very close. and we never walk away from those negotiations. we never issued any ultimatums and we believe that that grand compromise is still available if there is political will to do it. the reason why it ended, we brief, it is politically painful for everybody. the president realized he would take a lot of political heat if we got this grand bargain from his own party. certainly the speaker of the house might have. the president was willing to do that because he thought it was the right thing to do. we implore the speaker and other republicans to be willing to do that as well. lo
'm not addicted to. whether it be work or -- you know, food is a big issue all the time. >> you and charlie sheen go back a long way. when you were at your peak, apparently, who could out-party the other? >> charlie is a private partier. at least from what i can tell, he holes up in his cave. that's the impression i get. i can't imagine anybody doing more drugs than i did and living, and you know, especially with cocaine. and your resistance to these drugs. >> there's recreational drug taking and there's addiction. at your worst, what are we talking in terms of consumption? >> of about a half ounce a day of cocaine. >> really? >> it's crazy. and i'm so grateful to be alive. and i don't know why i am. >> did you remember how that made you feel? >> i will tell you this. the first time i tried cocaine, it made me feel great. it was in probably 1984. and then every time after that i tried to get that feeling of the first time, and i was chasing it, and at the end, in 1989, every time i did cocaine, i felt paranoid, depressed, and i -- i lied to myself and said i'll get back to that place you were a f
heroes from people you tell us about. to nominate someone you know who's making a big difference in your community go to cnn >>> tonight, one of the hottest young stars out of hollywood. no, not that hollywood, hollywood in northern ireland. 22-year-old golfer rory mcilroy is the biggest thing in sports since a guy named tiger. a small town boy made good. now, can he help me with my game >> i'll do what i can, but i can't work miracles. >> u.s. open champion rory mcilroy in his first sitdown since that stunning victory. >> for me, i won a golf tournament and that was really the end of it. but, you know, it's a bigger story than that. >> and then one of the greatest tennis players in the history of the sport, billie jean king. how she felt when she beat bobby rigs in that battle. sexes. >> i still wake up in a cold sweat thinking i have to play that match. oh, thank you, god. thank you for letting me win. >> the challenges she faced coming out. >> i didn't get comfortable in my own skin until i was probably 51. >> and my surprising connection with her. i was a ball boy at wimbledon. >> no
but it's not. it's like a test. the whole thing is like one big test. >> fascinating watching you because i know you don't like watching yourself, do you? >> i'm -- i have gotten a lot better. since i've been producing i've gotten a lot better with it. i hate my voice. i hate the way i sound. i think that was always -- >> it's not your real voice, that's the problem. >> maybe because it sounds very foreign. but since i've become a producer and i've had to sit in editing rooms for hours and watch footage be cut together, i think -- i think i've gotten better to kind of take myself out of it and really look at it as making a film and you kind of take all that weight off just yourself, which has been really great for me as an actor. >> you bring incredible intensity to this stuff. scared the life out of me. i'm just watching you from a monitor. you're like a raging volcano in some of these parts. >> a raging volcano who likes to clean. >> yes. the most weird type of raging volcano. >> look, that film, taylor hackford, the director of that film, cast me after several screen tests and audition
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 189 (some duplicates have been removed)